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Jul. 29th, 2009 @ 12:18 am Zometool structural analysis
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manheadphones v1
technolope:
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From:don_t_know_how
Date:July 30th, 2009 04:58 am (UTC)

Re: 2 questions

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"Unfortunately, Zometool's connection mechanisms don't allow arbitrary connections."

are parts (almost absolutely) rigid? i think that when it comes to thousands of them, you can use.. ahem.. a long straight beam and then bend it.
it could be ok if bending tension remains under the level of the weight compression.

however, when you make it big enough, compression might bring about buckling problems.
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From:technolope
Date:July 30th, 2009 05:57 am (UTC)

Re: 2 questions

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Right---each node has 24 (or 30, or something) rigid holes, accepting one of three types of rod end-shapes (triangle, rectangle, pentagon). The design is such that there is a great variety of constructions possible, though the angles are fixed.

I would suspect that any structure with beams long enough to bend also have beams long enough to buckle---as you note. The strongest parts of the structure were the zones with lots of nodes and lots of very short connecting segments. Those were little rocks.
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From:don_t_know_how
Date:July 30th, 2009 06:10 am (UTC)

Re: 2 questions

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another solution(?) might be to make in the respect of the connection angles, with as many bars as possible and it HUGE enough for the "microscopic" geometry not to matter. (there are many buildings withe carved walls or arches built with rectangular bricks)

once again, the basis elements resistance to buckling would have to be ensured

good luck